In the summer of 2019, I read Thomas Page McBee's book Amateur for the first time. I was riveted 
There are innumerable 


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Avar, they/them
To me masculinity has always been a label that others have prescribed to me or expected of me. At times it’s had positive connotations and at others it has had negative ones. In my day-to-day I tend to be mostly aware that people view my gender presentation as masculine. From a young age I have always presented in a way that was comfortable to me, and it wasn’t until I came into contact with areas of secondary socialisation that I realised this was frowned upon. There are times where I have tried to conform to societal expectations of femininity or masculinity. Those periods never tended to last very long and always came from a place of insecurity. 
Gender, to me, is less of an inherent feeling or known truth. It is a tool used to justify the historic and contemporary oppression and discrimination of those who aren’t cishet white men. I refuse to play a role in perpetuating that violence. 
Within mainstream society there has been a growing challenge to ‘toxic masculinity’ which couldn’t come quick enough. However, I think this reckoning must also be had within the trans community, particularly within the trans masc community. I find many trans masc spaces have a significant undercurrent of misogyny and toxic masculinity or machismo which is often unchallenged under the guise of not wanting to cause dysphoria. To hell with that. 
On the other hand, though there are many trans mascs who are rejecting standard norms of masculinity and approaching gender performance and presentation with a softer and more open, and positive approach. Showing that masculinity can be something other than aggressive, misogynistic, and harsh. I think this is the way we should encourage in all men and mascs, cis or not.
Naphon, he/him
To me masculinity has always been a label that others have prescribed to me or expected of me. At times it’s had positive connotations and at others it has had negative ones. In my day-to-day I tend to be mostly aware that people view my gender presentation as masculine. From a young age I have always presented in a way that was comfortable to me, and it wasn’t until I came into contact with areas of secondary socialisation that I realised this was frowned upon. There are times where I have tried to conform to societal expectations of femininity or masculinity. Those periods never tended to last very long and always came from a place of insecurity. 
Gender, to me, is less of an inherent feeling or known truth. It is a tool used to justify the historic and contemporary oppression and discrimination of those who aren’t cishet white men. I refuse to play a role in perpetuating that violence. 
Within mainstream society there has been a growing challenge to ‘toxic masculinity’ which couldn’t come quick enough. However, I think this reckoning must also be had within the trans community, particularly within the trans masc community. I find many trans masc spaces have a significant undercurrent of misogyny and toxic masculinity or machismo which is often unchallenged under the guise of not wanting to cause dysphoria. To hell with that. 
On the other hand, though there are many trans mascs who are rejecting standard norms of masculinity and approaching gender performance and presentation with a softer and more open, and positive approach. Showing that masculinity can be something other than aggressive, misogynistic, and harsh. I think this is the way we should encourage in all men and mascs, cis or not.
Val, they/them
To me masculinity has always been a label that others have prescribed to me or expected of me. At times it’s had positive connotations and at others it has had negative ones. In my day-to-day I tend to be mostly aware that people view my gender presentation as masculine. From a young age I have always presented in a way that was comfortable to me, and it wasn’t until I came into contact with areas of secondary socialisation that I realised this was frowned upon. There are times where I have tried to conform to societal expectations of femininity or masculinity. Those periods never tended to last very long and always came from a place of insecurity. 
Gender, to me, is less of an inherent feeling or known truth. It is a tool used to justify the historic and contemporary oppression and discrimination of those who aren’t cishet white men. I refuse to play a role in perpetuating that violence. 
Within mainstream society there has been a growing challenge to ‘toxic masculinity’ which couldn’t come quick enough. However, I think this reckoning must also be had within the trans community, particularly within the trans masc community. I find many trans masc spaces have a significant undercurrent of misogyny and toxic masculinity or machismo which is often unchallenged under the guise of not wanting to cause dysphoria. To hell with that. 
On the other hand, though there are many trans mascs who are rejecting standard norms of masculinity and approaching gender performance and presentation with a softer and more open, and positive approach. Showing that masculinity can be something other than aggressive, misogynistic, and harsh. I think this is the way we should encourage in all men and mascs, cis or not.
Ewan, he/him
To me masculinity has always been a label that others have prescribed to me or expected of me. At times it’s had positive connotations and at others it has had negative ones. In my day-to-day I tend to be mostly aware that people view my gender presentation as masculine. From a young age I have always presented in a way that was comfortable to me, and it wasn’t until I came into contact with areas of secondary socialisation that I realised this was frowned upon. There are times where I have tried to conform to societal expectations of femininity or masculinity. Those periods never tended to last very long and always came from a place of insecurity. 
Gender, to me, is less of an inherent feeling or known truth. It is a tool used to justify the historic and contemporary oppression and discrimination of those who aren’t cishet white men. I refuse to play a role in perpetuating that violence. 
Within mainstream society there has been a growing challenge to ‘toxic masculinity’ which couldn’t come quick enough. However, I think this reckoning must also be had within the trans community, particularly within the trans masc community. I find many trans masc spaces have a significant undercurrent of misogyny and toxic masculinity or machismo which is often unchallenged under the guise of not wanting to cause dysphoria. To hell with that. 
On the other hand, though there are many trans mascs who are rejecting standard norms of masculinity and approaching gender performance and presentation with a softer and more open, and positive approach. Showing that masculinity can be something other than aggressive, misogynistic, and harsh. I think this is the way we should encourage in all men and mascs, cis or not.
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